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We Interrupt Our Normal Programming . . .



Dear reader,

My purpose today: I need your help!! I am looking to up my blogging and need help shifting gears.

First, if you are one of my few but growing number of readers, why do you read my posts? What is it that makes you click on the blog posts I share on Facebook? (If it is because we are blood, and you feel obligated to click and pretend to care, then that's okay so let me know.)

Second, what do you wish I would write about? Are there topics I could cover to help you in any way or solve a problem? 

Finally, what suggestions do you have for a new Blog name and/or web domain? I don't want to go too much into why I am thinking of changing my current domain, which is themereedges.com (Job 26:14). Just know that I plan on it unless someone convinces me otherwise.

The domain name and title are dependent on why people (almost all women) read what I write. Obviously, I am not entirely sure why I have the readers that I do (with bare minimal marketing thus far), but I can make some guesses. Here are some words and phrases I've been playing around with lately: mercy & woman or girl (in all combinations), real women (insert action verb), a woman asks, substance of mercy, to live as a woman, etc. I've also thought of a combination of woman or mercy with saucy, gritty, whimsy, or lucid.

Go ahead throw out an idea and call foul on one or all of the above words. If I pick your idea as a site name or domain, I will forever memorialize you in my About page. Who can pass up that offer?

Thank you and God bless, Stacia

[Updated & Reposted: 10:54 AM, 9/9/17]





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